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ORLANDO, Fla. (May 25, 2017) – U.S. adults who have traveled during the past year feel it is important to visit “vanishing destinations” before they disappear, according to the latest travelhorizons™ survey of 2,300 U.S. adults conducted by travel marketing organization MMGY Global.

In the survey, “vanishing destinations” include the Great Barrier Reef, Glacier National Park and Venice, Italy.  Nearly four in ten feel it is very to extremely important to visit these destinations. We can see this most prominently in Millennials, the affluent and those with college degrees or higher.  

The level of importance of visiting vanishing destinations seems to decrease with age. Half (51 percent) of Millennial travelers feel it is important, significantly more than all other generations, followed by nearly four in ten Xers (37 percent) and one quarter of Young Boomers (27 percent). Those with an annual household income of $100,000 or more display the highest level of importance to visit vanishing destinations.  Similarly, interest tends to decrease as household income decreases. Four in ten travelers with an annual household income of $150,000 or more (42 percent) and $100,000 - $149,999 (39 percent) feel it is important to visit these destinations.  More than four in ten (44 percent) of travelers with a college degree or higher feel it is important to visit vanishing destinations, significantly more than those with partial college education (32 percent) or a high school diploma or less (27 percent).

U.S. travelers were also asked about the impact of climate change on their decision to visit destinations that are affected.  Four in ten (40 percent) U.S. travelers report climate change does impact their vacation destination decisions. Millennials, travelers with an annual household income of $50,000 - $149,999 and travelers with a college degree or higher are most likely to consider climate change when making destination decisions.  More than half of Millennials (53 percent) report climate change impacts their decision, significantly more compared to other generations (Xers: 37 percent, Young Boomers: 30 percent, Older Boomers: 28 percent, Matures: 23 percent).  More than four in ten travelers with an annual household income of $50,000 - $99,999 (43 percent) or $100,000 - $149,999 (43 percent) report climate change has an impact, followed by 38 percent with an annual household income under $30,000, 35 percent with $30,000 - $49,999 and 34 percent with $150,000 or more. Half of travelers with a college degree or higher (49 percent) report that climate change has an impact, significantly more than those with lower education levels (some college: 31 percent, high school diploma: 30 percent).

For more information about these insights, or to obtain a copy of the full travelhorizons™ report, visit http://www.mmgyglobal.com.  


About travelhorizonsTM
TravelhorizonsTM is a quarterly survey of Americans’ travel intentions viewed through the lens of emerging economic, social and political developments. This iteration of the nationally representative survey of 2,302 pre-qualified adults was conducted from April 17 - April 30, 2017.

About MMGY Global

MMGY Global is the largest integrated travel marketing organization in the world. With more than 35 years of experience in the travel, hospitality and entertainment industries, the award-winning agency provides expertise in all marketing channels, serving the world’s premier travel and tourism brands. MMGY Global maintains the industry's most complete database of U.S. resident travel information and, for 27 consecutive years, has published the Portrait of American Travelers®, the most comprehensive survey of the travel habits, preferences and intentions of Americans. Today, the organization represents six offices across the globe and four agency brands including MMGY, DK Shifflet, Myriad International Marketing and NJF. Visit mmgyglobal.com for more information.

Contact: Erica Campbell

ecampbell@njfpr.com / 646-237-4519

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