.
Budget Your Time and Be More Successful


by Kirby D. Payne, CHA , January, 1999 

Kirby  D.  Payne,  CHA  is  President of Minneapolis based  American  Hospitality  Management Company,  a growing hotel investment, management and consulting firm.   Payne is also Secretary Elect of the American Hotel & Motel Association, and Chair of the  AH&MA's  International Council of Hotel-Hotel Management Companies.  Additional  articles can be found on the internet at www.American-Hospitality.com.


One of our company's most valuable assets is its general managers and their time. A certain amount of structure is necessary in the typical business day of a general manager. 

While the circumstances of every hotel are different due to size, level of service, number of departments, etc., and therefore one daily schedule does not work everywhere, we do outline a basic schedule as a starting point for general manager to develop his/her own schedule. 

We feel it is important for a general manager to make and keep lists in an organized fashion. A number of Post-it notes and numerous separated sheets of paper will not work. It must be a notebook, pad or Scan Card System. 

The suggested schedule outlined below is designed to keep the general manager focused on various tasks and minimize interruptions. While this schedule will not work for everyone and certainly won't convert a disorganized scatterbrained person into a model for a time management class, it will serve as a workable, beginning structure for many. It is based on dividing the day into quarters. 

First Quarter 

During this period the first thing to be accomplished should be a walk around the hotel to insure the day is starting smoothly with proper staffing, morning operations are well underway and that the hotel is presentable to guests who are coming from their rooms or into the hotel for various events. 

Following that walking inspection, the general manager should stop by the front office to become familiar with the previous night's occupancy, front office log and the expected departures and arrivals situation for the next day or two. Subsequently he/she should collect the various reports prepared overnight and retire to the office to complete the various daily reporting and administrative chores required. 

During this period interruptions should be kept to a minimum, no appointments should be scheduled and receiving telephone calls should be avoided. They can be returned later. This is a good time for the general manager to work on any tasks that he/she does not particularly like to do. Following this schedule during the first portion of the day should result in the hotel getting of to a good start and the general manager completing most of the required administrative and mundane tasks early in the day. 

Second Quarter

This period of time which runs to or through lunch should be used for inspecting and training. It is a good time to walk various parts of the hotel again to see what has been accomplished and how well it was done. 

Stop and visit with supervisors and line staff in order to be familiar with them and their current challenges. It may be a good idea to set up one or more brief meetings to discuss problems / solutions or to work one-on-one training key people. 

Right at noon return telephone calls which were received earlier from people whom you do not particularly want or need to talk to in your time zone. 

Overall, this fourth is when the general manager gets around the hotel to do many of the hands on things it takes to successfully manage a hotel and interacts with the staff. 

Third Quarter 

This period typically falls in the first half of the afternoon. This time might be used as marketing time outside the hotel, longer staff and training meetings, and various other tasks. This time is less structured and can be used to make and receive telephone calls, etc. 

Last Quarter 

This time segment should include finishing up any projects which need to be completed and various items from the previous fourth of the day. The time should also be used to tour the hotel ad make inquiries as to its preparedness for the evening's business and the appearance of the property. This is also the time where the general manager should review notes and lists made during the day, cross off items accomplished, follow up on critical complete items and add items for the future. It may also be used to pick up the telephone and check with
subordinates about their own lists. 

General Comments 

We believe general managers should vary their arrival and departure times and should approach the hotel from different directions and enter through different doors. He/she should park the car in different places around the hotel's property and even on adjacent streets occasionally. The reasons will become self evident in a short time. 

General managers need to help their staff manage their time in an efficient way. Over time we have found that strong time management skills have the biggest effect on a hotel's success. 

The general manager should set the example on good time management and efficient work habits so that the key staff also learns to remain focused on the various tasks, projects and goals they are working on rather than jumping from one issue to another without ever competing one. 

Also See: Room Service or is it Food Delivery? / Kirby D. Payne, CHA
Lets Talk About Cost Controls / Kirby D. Payne 
Increasing Food and Beverage Revenues in Hotels / Kirby D. Payne, CHA
Seven Steps to Food Cost Control / Kirby D. Payne, CHA
For additional information, contact: 
Kirby D. Payne at the firm 
American Hospitality Management Company
1500 South Highway 100, #375
Minneapolis, MN 55416 
Phone: 763-591-7640 Fax: 763-591-1593 
email: kpayne@american-hospitality.com

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